Veneers

Veneers are a miracle of modern dentistry that makes it possiable to restore life like beauty to teeth that are stained, chipped, cracked, crooked, or separated by a wide space.

For the first time in the history of dentistry you can have a perfect color match and a fit that defies detection. In the past, the use of plastic or resin-filled bonding materials proved to be less than desirable because they were not color stable, stained easily, and became rough and pitted in a short period of time. As a result, these restorations had to be replaced, much to the patient's disappointment.

Porcelain has changed all that. Because porcelain is strong, durable,and wear resistant, it maintains its smooth color-perfect surface for years.The porcelain veneer with its translucency will enhance your smile and overall appeal at work or play. In addition to its esthetic benefits, veneers offer you comfort and convenience. A painless procedure, it requires no anesthetic because there is little or no tooth reduction and requires no temporaries. Most times the restoration can be completed in two brief appoinments.

Teeth Whitening

Teeth Whitening is the most commonly requested dental procedure. It’s designed to enhance you’re appearance by reducing tooth discoloration and staining, and to give a brighter, whiter smile.

Tooth discoloration and staining is a relatively common problem. Teeth are porous and are therefore not stain resistant. Red wine, soda, coffee and tea, among other food and drink, contribute to the discoloration of teeth over time. Medications such as the antibiotic tetracycline can cause significant staining, resulting in yellow, grayish teeth. Smoker’s teeth can become permanently stained if the discoloration is not treated in a timely manner. Discoloration can also occur secondary to conditions such as fluorosis, dentin and enamel dysplasia and dental caries.

Tooth trauma caused by a fall or collision can cause tooth discoloration. Trauma could result in tooth death (tooth necrosis) which would cause discoloration. Typically, root canal therapy is required as the treatment for tooth necrosis, after which internal bleaching can be performed to correct discoloration.

At - home teeth whitening

Home whitening allows the patient to control the whitening process. A prescription – strength gel and custom upper and lower mouth trays are provided to the patient. The whitening gel is placed over your teeth for varying times, from 30 to 60 minutes twice a day to over night. Results are achieved in as little as three days, but more commonly 5-10 or more days. Touch up whitening can be done as needed using the same materials.

Dental Implants

Dental implants are artificial tooth replacements that are used to counter tooth loss. The procedure is categorized as a form of prosthetic (artificial replacement) dentistry, though it falls into the category of cosmetic dentistry as well.

Although you have a number of restorative options for the treatment of missing teeth, none have proven to be as functionally effective and durable as implants. In many cases, dental implants may be the only logical choice for the restoration of all necessary functionality of the teeth and supporting structures.

Advantages of Implant Dentistry

Dental implants are stronger and more durable than their restorative counterparts (bridges and dentures) implants offer a permanent solution to tooth loss. Additionally, implants may be used in conjunction with other restorative procedures for maximum effectiveness. For example, a single implant can serve to support a crown replacing a single missing tooth. Implants can also be used to support a dental bridge for the replacement of multiple missing teeth, and can be used with dentures to increase stability and reduce gum irritation. Procedural advancements, including the development of narrower “mini” implants, mean that more people than ever before are finding themselves candidates for implantation. However, candidacy for implantation still varies, meaning that your dentist may determine that you should opt for an alternative restoration.

The Dental Implant Procedure

Today's dental implants are virtually indistinguishable from other teeth. This appearance is aided in part by the structural and functional connection between the dental implant and the living bone. Implants are typically placed in a single sitting but require a period of osseointegration.

Osseointegration is the process by which direct anchorage of a dental implant root and the bone of the jaw occurs. Osseointegrated implants are the most commonly used and successful type of dental implant. An osseointegrated implant takes anywhere from three to six months to anchor and heal, at which point your dentist can complete the procedure with the placement of a crown. Once the implant has anchored with the jawbone, artificial prosthesis may be attached and the process is done. If osseointegration does not occur, the implant will fail.

Preparing the Jaw for Implantation:

A dental implant is commonly composed of a titanium material screw and a crown. A small-diameter hole (pilot hole) is drilled at edentulous (where there is no tooth) jaw sites in order to guide the titanium screw that holds a dental implant in place. To avoid damaging vital jaw and face structures like the inferior alveolar nerve in the mandible (lower jaw), a dentist must use great skill and expertise when boring the pilot hole and sizing the jaw bone.

Placement of the Implant:

After the initial pilot hole has been drilled into the appropriate jaw site, it is slowly widened to allow for placement of the implant screw. Following this placement, a protective cover screw is placed on top to allow the implant site to heal and the dental implant to anchor (osseointegration). After several months, the protective cover is removed and a temporary crown is placed on top of the dental implant. The temporary crown serves as a template around which the gum grows and shapes itself in a natural way. The process is completed when the temporary crown is replaced with a permanent crown.

Success Rates of Dental Implants

Dental implants are among the most successful procedures in dentistry. There is no guarantee that an implant procedure will be successful, but studies have shown a five-year success rate of 95% for lower jaw implants and 90% for upper jaw implants. The success rate for upper jaw implants is slightly lower because the upper jaw (especially the posterior section) is less dense than the lower jaw, making successful implantation and osseointegration potentially more difficult to achieve. Lower posterior implantation has the highest success rate for all dental implants.

Dental implants may fail for a number of reasons. The cause is often related to a failure in the osseointegration process. For example, if the implant is placed in a poor position, osseointegration may not take place. Dental implants may break or become infected (like natural teeth) and crowns may become loose.

If you are a smoker who is considering a dental implant, your dentist will likely advise you to give up smoking before undergoing the process because smokers face a higher risk of implant failure. Since the procedure can be extremely expensive, you risk wasting your money on dental implants if you do not give up the habit.

On the plus side, dental implants are not susceptible to the formation of cavities; still, poor oral hygiene can lead to the development of peri-implantitis around dental implants. This disease is tantamount to the development of periodontitis (severe gum disease) around a natural tooth.

Implant Dentistry: New Procedural Strategies

Dentists trained to perform implants, crowns and/or surgery have begun to use a new strategy for the replacement of missing teeth. Dental implants are placed into locations where teeth have recently been extracted. When successful, this new strategy can shed months off of the treatment time associated with dental implants because osseointegration is sped up. Candidacy for this type of early intervention is dependant upon anatomical factors of the extracted tooth site. For example, in many cases the extracted tooth site is wider than the implant, making it impossible to place the implant into the site immediately after extraction. Dental work would have to be performed first in order to create a perfect fit for the implant.

Crowns and Bridges

Dental crowns, also known as “caps,” preserve the functionality of damaged teeth. Crowns may be used to protect a cracked tooth, restore functionality of a tooth with excessive decay, or replace a pre-existing crown. The purpose of a dental crown is to encase a needy tooth with a custom-designed material. Dentist today have a variety of conservative treatment options through which to restore teeth. If possible, these options should be explored and discussed before selecting the full coverage crown.

The Clinical Procedure

During the crown procedure, your dentist prepares the tooth and makes a molded impression of the teeth to send to a dental laboratory. a fitted, temporary crown is created during this visit to temporarily protect the tooth while the final restoration is being made in the dental laboratory. Once completed, the crown is cemented at a later visit.

Fixed bridges

Fixed bridges are an extension of the dental crown treatment for replacement of missing teeth. Crowns are placed on the teeth adjacent to the missing tooth or teeth and connected to a missing tooth-like replica.

Dental Sealants

Many people have deep pits and grooves in their teeth where bacteria and food particles can hide and cause decay. Children with poor brushing habits may also develop decay on hard-to-reach molars. For situations like these, dental sealants offer a means of protecting molar and premolar chewing surfaces from decay. Recognized by the American Dental Association as a key means of cavity prevention, dental sealants are simply a thin plastic film that can be applied teeth.

First, your dentist or dental hygienist will prepare your teeth with a cleaning and etching solution. After about 15 seconds, they thoroughly rinse the solution, dry the surface, coat your teeth with the sealant, and harden it with a curing light. The entire procedure is fast, easy, and comfortable. It takes about 10 to 45 minutes, depending on the number of teeth to seal.

Dental sealants create an impenetrable physical barrier for small food particles and cavity-causing bacteria, making them highly effective in preventing tooth surface decay and the resulting cavities. Sealants can last up to ten years. Most insurance companies only cover sealant procedures at a minimal level, but the good news is that insurance companies seem to be recognizing this technique's value as a preventive measure that will help reduce future dental costs and more aggressive treatments.

Contact Us Today!

Peter Strumpf DDS PC
571 E Market St

Elmira, 14901


Phone: +1 0607 7322274 +1 0607 7322274

E-mail: DrStrumpf@verizon.net

Peter Strumpf DDS PC
571 E Market St
Elmira14901

Phone: +1 0607 7322274

E-mail: DrStrumpf@verizon.net

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